Biomedical Sciences

Classes

BMS 5002: Biomedical Pharmacology

Biomedical pharmacology presents an overview of the basic concepts and principles of pharmacology complemented by selected topics in pharmacotherapeutics. Students explore mechanisms of drug action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, and toxicology. Additional classroom sessions highlight the basic and clinical pharmacology of agents that exert effects on a variety of physiologic systems. Students will be required to complete an innovative new drug capstone project demonstrating their ability to provide peer-feedback, work on a team, appropriately review and synthesize recent medical literature, and conduct an oral presentation. Successful completion of the course will prepare students for doctoral level study of pharmacology.

BMS 5008: Medical Humanities

The Medical Humanities course examines the relationships between the humanities and biomedical sciences. Topics vary by year and include, but are not limited to, communication, implicit bias mitigation, human subject research history and ethics, professional identity formation, illness narratives. This course is grounded in a variety of literary and textual sources and involves small and large group discussions, collaboration, written analyses, service-learning, and critical reflection, all of which are intended to foster self-examination and compassionate behavior. 

BMS 5010: Journal Club

The course aims to provide MSBS students the opportunity to evaluate and investigate evidence through critically reading, interpreting, and presenting primary literature for peers, RVUCOM students, and faculty. This course helps students stay abreast of current knowledge in the field, develop presentation skills, and create solutions to real-world issues through applying knowledge from the biomedical sciences. Topics will include advances across biomedical research and inter-professional teamwork. Emphasis is placed on developing presentation and teaching skills and in communicating scientific studies in seminar. The format of the course includes: 1) an introduction to and guided research of issues from national health initiatives (NIH, CDC, HHS and/or HRSA); 2) critical appraisal and formal presentation of biomedical research.

BMS 5011: Evidence-Based Medicine

The role of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is to foster students' information literacy and develop understanding of the process of evidence-based medicine in order to leverage, create, use, and connect information to scenarios. The course is organized around the five elements of evidence-based medicine: ASK, ACQUIRE, APPRAISE, APPLY, ASSESS. Each of those components will be explored in depth to increase the awareness, understanding, and skills of the students. Students will learn to identify and understand various research methodologies, research designs, and bio-statistical concepts as elements of developing their understanding of medical and scientific information. 

BMS 5012: Foundations of Success

This course is designed to introduce students to the foundational skills necessary to be a successful graduate student. This course will focus on a variety of techniques to increase student confidence and develop graduate level study skills, and professionalism. It will cover principles of learning strategies, problem solving, note-taking, test-taking, critical listening and thinking, self-assessment, goal setting, and time management.  

BMS 5021: Molecular Basis of Medicine I

This course is a two-semester course that incorporates a case-based approach to investigative fundamental biomedical concepts. The objective of the course is to promote student learning of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms underlying normal physiology and metabolism, thus providing a foundation for understanding disease processes. The course provides a foundation in cellular and molecular biology, including cell structure, cellular macromolecules, DNA and RNA structure and function, protein synthesis, and regulation of gene expression, energetics, metabolism, regulation, organization and function of cellular organelles, flow of genetic information, and the regulation of selected cell activities.

BMS 5022: Molecular Basis of Medicine II

A continuation of BMS 5021, Molecular Basis of Medicine II, incorporates a case-based approach to investigative fundamental biomedical concepts. The objective of the course is to promote student learning of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms underlying normal physiology and metabolism, thus providing a foundation for understanding disease processes. The course provides a foundation in cellular and molecular biology, including cell structure, cellular macromolecules, DNA and RNA structure and function, protein synthesis, and regulation of gene expression, energetics, metabolism, regulation, organization and function of cellular organelles, flow of genetic information, and the regulation of selected cell activities.

BMS 5041: Physiology I

This course is the first of two one-semester courses which together provide a complete systems-based curriculum to enable the student an opportunity to build a cognitive framework and knowledge base necessary to understand and medically apply normal human physiology to pathophysiology.  Systems covered in the first semester include cellular physiology, homeostatic mechanisms, basic neurophysiology, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, and the renal system. Basic clinical skills, clinical reasoning, physical exam skills are also integrated throughout. This curriculum combines lecture with clinical correlations, case studies, independent study, projects, and simulation activities. 

BMS 5042: Physiology II

A continuation of BMS5042 Physiology I, this course provides a systems-based curriculum to enable the student an opportunity to build a cognitive framework and knowledge base necessary to understand and medically apply normal human physiology to pathophysiology.  Systems covered in the first semester include cellular physiology, homeostatic mechanisms, basic neurophysiology, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, and the renal system. Basic clinical skills, clinical reasoning, physical exam skills are also integrated throughout. This curriculum combines lecture with clinical correlations, case studies, independent study, projects, and simulation activities.

BMS 5051: Human Anatomy I

This is the first of a two-semester course encompassing all aspects of human functional anatomy and clinical gross anatomy. This course will focus on the gross anatomy of all systems in the human body. In addition, imaging techniques such as x-ray radiography, CT scans, and MRI emphasizing structural relationships will introduce students to a clinical perspective of the structure of the human body. Course objectives include the acquisition of anatomical structural knowledge, the development of oral presentation and written communication skills, as well as the development of critical assessment of biomedical literature. Students will experience hands on learning with cadavers dissection. Learning is facilitated through lecture, team problem based learning, and clinical case presentations.

BMS 5052: Human Anatomy II

This is the second of a two-semester course encompassing all aspects of human functional anatomy and clinical gross anatomy. This course will focus on the gross anatomy of all systems in the human body. In addition, imaging techniques such as x-ray radiography, CT scans, and MRI emphasizing structural relationships will introduce students to a clinical perspective of the structure of the human body. Course objectives include the acquisition of anatomical structural knowledge, the development of oral presentation and written communication skills, as well as the development of critical assessment of biomedical literature. Students will experience hands on learning with cadavers dissection. Learning is facilitated through lecture, team problem based learning, and clinical case presentations. 

BMS 5060: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases

This course introduces graduate students to fundamental principles of microbiology including microbial structure/diversity, microbial metabolism and pathogenicity, and classes and actions of antimicrobial drugs. This overview includes discussions of the interaction between pathogen and host during the infectious process and adaptations by the pathogens to overcome or evade the immune system and cause human disease. Representative microorganisms belonging to each class of pathogen (bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic) are discussed. Other topics will include emerging diseases, public health epidemiology, vaccines, antimicrobial resistance, and eradication of disease. A combination of methods will be used to deliver material including, but not limited to, didactic lectures, small group work, and case studies/applications. 

BMS 5070: Immunology

This course is designed to introduce students to the foundational knowledge necessary to understand the normal and abnormal functions of the immune system. Immunological principles involving innate and adaptive immunity, host responses to pathogens, blood groups, immunopathology, immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity, vaccines, transplantation, classes and actions of immunologically active drugs, and targeted immunotherapies will be discussed. Didactic lectures, small group discussions, clinical case studies, designated reading assignments, and application sessions will be utilized in this course.  In addition, there will be an interdisciplinary component to this course as students will also write critical reflections regarding team service-learning projects.